Helping change the lives of those suffering with Parkinson’s.

THE GOAL OF THE CENTER

The programs we will create will be specialized and embedded into new or existing locations in partnership with the UC Center for Integrative Health and Wellness and the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute. The programs will utilize scientifically supported integrative health treatment options to reduce physical symptoms while contributing to optimizing psychological, social and spiritual health and wellness as well as greater independence and sense of community. My goal is to provide greater access to people with Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases to these integrative health services.

For more information on the UC Center for Integrative Health and Wellness and the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute visit: www.uchealth.com/parkinsons

ABOUT PARKINSON’S

Parkinson’s disease is a condition that affects control over your movements. Its motor symptoms are mainly caused by a decrease in the manufacturing of dopamine, a chemical that helps nerve cells in your brain communicate with each other. When dopamine is missing from certain areas of the brain, the messages that tell your body how to move are lost or distorted. This can lead to symptoms such as shaking, stiffness and slow movement. There’s no cure for Parkinson’s disease but proper treatment can help ease symptoms and allow you to live a full, active life.

• Nearly one million people will be living with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in the U.S. by 2020, which is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease (or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

• Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year.

• More than 10 million people worldwide are living with PD.

• Over 7000 cases in the Cincinnati Metropolitan area

• The incidence of Parkinson’s disease increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with PD are diagnosed before age 50.

• Men are 1.5 times more likely to have Parkinson’s disease than women.

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